Uluru Central Australia Rain Event Amazing !!

Uluru located in the Kata Tjuta National Park Central Australia as you’ve never seen it before! Barely recognisable in a series of photographs taken during torrential rain. For local photographer Peter Carroll, it was a 20 year wait to capture rain on the rock. I have added some background information below on this sacred and timeless place in Australia.

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The Aboriginal traditional landowners of Uluru and Kata Tjuta, are Yankunytjatjara and Pitjantjatjara people. They speak their own language and teach it to their children. Uluru and Kata Tjuta were created by their creation ancestors. In their travels they left marks in the land and made laws for them to keep and live by.
Uluru rises 348 metres above the plain, more than 860 metres above sea level. That’s higher than the Eiffel Tower in Paris or the Chrysler Building in New York. If you walk right around the base of Uluru, you’ll find it has a circumference of 9.4 kilometres. That’s about 5.8 miles. The tallest dome of Kata Tjuta rises 546 metres above the plain, or 1,066 metres above sea level. That’s the same size as the One World Trade Centre under construction in New York.

Anangu people own all of Uluru and Kata Tjuta and lease it back to Parks Australia to be jointly managed as a national park. This arrangement first came into place in October 1985, in an historic moment known today as handback.

In 1950 Ayers Rock, today known as Uluru, was declared a national park. In 1958 both Ayers Rock and Mt Olga (Kata Tjuta) were excised from an Aboriginal reserve to form the Ayers Rock Mt Olga National Park. It took more than 35 years campaigning for Anangu to be recognised as the park’s traditional owners and given the deeds back to their land.

Anangu own all of Uluru and Kata Tjuta and lease it back to Parks Australia to be jointly managed as a national park. This arrangement first came into place in October 1985, in an historic moment known today as handback. Anangu have lived and managed this country for thousands upon thousands of years. Archaeological evidence shows Aboriginal people have lived in Central Australia for at least 30,000 years.

Uluru is a living cultural landscape. Anangu are guided by Tjukurpa (law) to keep both culture and country strong. This is something that has never changed. If you visit Uluru you may see people dot painting, performing inma (traditional dance and song), telling stories or gathering bush tucker.

Each year more than 250,000 people visit the park from all around the world.
Simply breathtaking !

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